The sphere of exploitation

“When the team further untangled the web of ownership, it found much of it tracked back to a ‘super-entity’ of 147 even more tightly knit companies – all of their ownership was held by other members of the super-entity – that controlled 40 per cent of the total wealth in the network. ‘In effect, less than 1 per cent of the companies were able to control 40 per cent of the entire network’, says Glattfelder. Most were financial institutions. The top 20 included Barclays Bank, JPMorgan Chase & Co, and The Goldman Sachs Group. …  ‘It’s disconcerting to see how connected things really are’, agrees George Sugihara of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, a complex systems expert who has advised Deutsche Bank.”

More here and here.

 

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3 Responses to The sphere of exploitation

  1. Brian Holmes says:

    This is absolutely fucking brilliant. Ditto for This is What Monopoly looks like. I love this blog. Thanks for all the great work. Brian
    PS – to all lazy readers: the link to the actual paper is here:
    http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/1107/1107.5728v2.pdf

  2. I just want to second that, this blog is incredible, thank you for putting this information out in a form with such impact!

  3. Bernard says:

    See also this other piece:
    Y. Rumpala, “Knowledge and praxis of networks as a political project”, Twenty-First Century Society, Volume 4, Issue 3, November 2009.
    Abstract:
    Modern-day society is increasingly described as an extensive web of networks, but as such, it is often perceived and experienced as elusive. In light of this paralysing description, this paper aims to highlight the potentially political dimension of network analysis, namely as defined in the social sciences, and of the notion of networks itself. It will be shown that a political project could, in this case, be built on the desire to know this reticular world better, but also to be able to act appropriately towards it. Three steps are proposed to specify how such a political project could be built. The first step aims at deploying knowledge of networks and emphasises the usefulness of a procedure to trace them. The second step shows the possibilities that this knowledge offers, particularly in allowing one to find one’s bearings in a world which is frequently described as veering towards an increasing complexity, and by helping to rebuild the selection criteria for connections in this world, thanks to an additional degree of reflexivity. The third step draws on these points to extend them and bring out potentialities with regards to the intervention capacities in network configurations.
    (also available at: http://yannickrumpala.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/mapping_responsibilities/ )

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